Since 1912, Girl Scouts of America’s aim has been to empower girls to help teach values such as honesty, fairness, courage, compassion and character through service to others.

On Oct. 14, Troop 789 continued this tradition awarding the Silver Award to scouts Ashleigh Houff, 13, and Mackenzie Camp, 14, both girls are Fort Bragg Family members. The award is the second highest achievement in Girl Scouting.

It symbolizes a Girl Scout cadette’s accomplishments and her community service as she discovers her strengths and takes action to make the world a better place.

To earn the award, the pair had to plan and implement a project with a positive and lasting impact on the community.

“It feels awesome to earn the award,” said Mackenzie. “I’ve had so many people come up to me to say congratulations and ask questions about the Girl Scouts and how they can get involved.”

Although neither Scout considers herself a future carpenter, the decision to build duck boxes for Ducks Unlimited seemed like the perfect way to give back to their community and serve as their project. As a requirement, the project had to have a minimum of 50 hours dedicated to it. The girls not only met that requirement, but built 200 boxes.

“I love Girl Scouts because I get to do things, go places and work on things that I wouldn’t normally if I weren’t in it,” said Houff.

While learning new skills is one of the many things Troop 789 continues to do, the Scouts are encouraged to learn from one another as well.

“I love that you get to meet lots of different types of people,” said Camp. “No one judges you and it’s just an amazing experience.”

The girls’ parents are encouraged by the lessons their children learn through scouting and have been pleased with the scouting experience.

“I think the biggest thing about Girl Scouts is that it’s a service organization and being that we are a service Family, it’s good to see that our children are kind of following in that same pathway,” said Capt. Mark Houff, Joint Special Operations Command.