Since the 2013 Combined Federal Campaign of Southeastern North Carolina held its kickoff Sept. 9, more than $615,000, or 27 percent of the $2,250,000 goal has been reached.

But, donations are still needed.

The CFC of SNC allows federal employees to make payroll deductions to various charitable organizations.

Begun in the early 1960s, employees continue to make the CFC the largest workplace philanthropic fundraiser in the world.

Fort Bragg is the homebase of the Southeastern region of the CFC. Other Southeastern North Carolina donors include Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, U.S. Postal Service workers and other federal employees. The U.S. Army Forces Command, along with the Army Reserve and the Army Special Operations commands have also donated funds in the past.

This year’s campaign chairman is Lt. Gen. Joseph Anderson, commanding general of the XVIII Airborne Corps and Fort Bragg. Anderson encourages federal employees to donate.

“Contributions received from our federal employees provide meals for the hungry, shelter for the homeless, educational scholarships, medical research and other important programs,” wrote Anderson, in a letter posted to the CFC of SNC website.

Dan Russell, CFC of SNC director, agrees.

“It is important to contribute because the contributions go to agencies and services to help those in need. The hungry, the homeless, animals, the environment, along with education, medical research and so many other great causes. We actually invest in our own future when we contribute.

We don’t know when we will need help but when we do, the CFC charities are there every day to step right in,” said Russell, who is also an Army retiree.

A $1-a-week contribution buys three, 30-minute appointments for health assessment and counseling for persons who face physical, developmental or mental health challenges; a $5-a-week contribution buys five wigs for children with cancer undergoing chemotherapy; and $10-a-week purchases a full year of scouting for two girls, according to the CFC of SNC website.

“I think that people who donate to a CFC charity have special hearts and understand how important each dollar is to so many in need,” Russell said.

“Our donors are the backbone for so many charities and are heroes to so many people and causes.”

Some CFC charities include the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Operation Smile, the American Red Cross, the Armed Services YMCA, Fisher House and Shriners Hospitals for Children.

For more information on donating to the CFC of SNC, visit www.senccfc.org.