Co-parenting after a split is rarely easy, especially if you have a contentious relationship with your ex-partner. Army Community Services (ACS) provides a co-parenting course each month at the Soldier Support center. The purpose of this class is to help parents who are divorced or separated, on how to raise their children cooperatively and more effectively with one another by focusing on the best interests of the children.

Co-parenting after a split is rarely easy, especially if you have a contentious relationship with your ex-partner. Army Community Services (ACS) provides a co-parenting course each month at the Soldier Support center. The purpose of this class is to help parents who are divorced or separated, on how to raise their children cooperatively and more effectively with one another by focusing on the best interests of the children.

“In this course we help parents communicate with each other because when parents’ divorce or separate, there’s a new relationship that has to form. It has to go to a more child strictly relationship, it is all about the child,” said …..

“We help families understand that and prepare for that type of communication, that’s our biggest goal.”

A class took place on May 8, which individuals were able to learn concepts such as benefits of separating personal conflicts from their role as parents and discuss visitation boundaries, the economic impact and responsibility of co-parenting as well as how to talk to children about divorce and separation.

During this course, worksheets, pamphlets and scenario videos were displayed in order to give parents a visual understanding of different challenges they may face when it comes to co-parenting.

“We have to understand that it is all about the children, what is right for them and how to face different situations so that they are not negativity impacted by choices or communication between the two parties.” Said

Top information that parents can take way from this course is information about effective collaborative parenting relationships that include:

• A recognition and respect for the ongoing nature of your parenting relationship

• A shared long-term goal / family vision

• A shared belief that each of you loves your child(ren) and want what's best for them, even if you don't agree on what that looks like.

You may be concerned about your ex’s parenting abilities, stressed about child support or other financial issues, feel worn down by conflict, or think you’ll never be able to overcome all the resentments in your relationship. But co-parenting amicably with your ex can give your children the stability, security, and close relationships with both parents they need.

Each class is two sessions, free and open to DoD ID Cardholders and their Family members.

For more information and registration, call 396-5521 or 677-2934.