It was spitting rain and the sky was overcast for the 4th Annual Run, Honor, Remember 5k on Saturday, but that didn’t stop Jessica Lallier, her Family and friends from running.

It was spitting rain and the sky was overcast for the 4th Annual Run, Honor, Remember 5k on Saturday, but that didn’t stop Jessica Lallier, her Family and friends from running.

Her sister, 1st Lt. Kathryn Bailey, was just one of the Fallen Soldiers represented by the boots at Hedrick Stadium, the start of the race.

“She was a big athlete, so now we try to organize a run twice a year for her, just to carry on her sense of working out and staying fit,” Lallier said.

Bailey joined the Army four years ago, became a pilot, and flew UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters. She was the Airframe Repair Platoon Leader in Delta Company, 2nd Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade at Wheeler Army Airfield, Hawaii. Last August, just weeks after her birthday, she was on a nighttime training exercise off the coast of Hawaii when her helicopter crashed into the water.

Her story is one of too many.

Len and his son Kimo walked among the boots before the race, looking for those with whom he served. Only half way through, he’d already found four.

Ashley Gentry and her mother stood over a boot with her father’s name and face.

On the field, crouched over one of nearly 7,000 boots were Rachel Nolen and her two children, Jamie Nolen and William Flathman. They were there in remembrance of Rachel’s late husband, Sgt. James Nolen.

He was a paratrooper with the Company C, 2nd Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. He died serving in Afghanistan in November 2009 alongside Pfc. Marcus Tynes when their vehicle struck an improvised explosive device.

It was just days before their first wedding anniversary, months before his wife gave birth to their only child, Jamie.

“It just breaks my heart cause you see all these boots ... there’s Families and people behind them ... to see so many out here ... it’s hard for me,” Nolen said.

Honoring Soldiers like Bailey and Nolen for their sacrifice is what the 5k is all about. For that reason, winners just weren’t important, and neither was the rain.