Master Sergeant Ethel A. Nock was inducted into the North Carolina Military Veterans Hall of Fame. Out of 22 service members, she was the second female inducted during the ceremony on May 19, in Charlotte.

Master Sergeant Ethel A. Nock was inducted into the North Carolina Military Veterans Hall of Fame. Out of 22 service members, she was the second female inducted during the ceremony on May 19, in Charlotte.

Her awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal and various civilian commendations.

She is recognized in the military community as a mentor, volunteer, and has dedicated her time in helping with Judge Advocate General, Family Advocacy, feeding the homeless and Falcon Children’s Home.

“It felt really good. While I was there, I met so many older Soldiers who were in War World I and Vietnam, which didn’t top what I had done. Meeting them and listening to their stories was amazing. It was great,” said Nock.

Before joining the military in 1976, Nock tried college and decided that it was not for her, so she decided to join the Army.

“I wanted to travel; I knew I wanted to do something different,” said Nock.

After she joined, Nock was one of the first group of females to be shipped to Fort Jackson, S.C. for basic training with male Soldiers. She spent 26 years serving her country while traveling to different duty stations across the world, including Korea and Germany.

“I went to Korea. That’s when life really kicked off for me,” said Nock. “My assignment there I really loved, and I did two years over there. After being in the military for 14 years, they told me in order to get promoted I had to either be a recruiter or go to drill sergeant school. Back then, it was very hard getting promoted in my military occupational specialty. Going to drill sergeant school was the best thing that happened in my career.”

Nock discusses some her experiences in the military that helped start her journey of helping others.

“When Desert Storm broke out, they did not let the Soldiers take leave. The Soldiers could not go home and there were some who had planned to go home and get married. We had Soldiers wanting to cut their wrist because they were so unhappy,” said Nock.

She spent that Christmas with her Soldiers in the barracks. She was able to relate to them and help them through that difficult time.

Nock retired from the military in 2002 and is now the manager at the ID card facility in the Soldiers Support Center.

“This is the largest ID facility in the world. We normally service anywhere from to 150 to 200 a day. I deal with all kinds of issues. Regardless of who you are or your color, if you have an issue, if I can help you, I will do it,” said Nock.

She is retiring next year from the ID facility and said that even after her retirement she plans to volunteer and help others.

She gives advice to those who are considering joining the military. “I tell folks first go to college, but college is not for everybody. Yet, the Army is not for everybody, but if you just give it a try, the benefits are great. The military is a great place to learn yourself, to pick a good skill that no one can ever take from you. You also get to travel. You get to do different things,” said Nock.

Veterans are inducted each year. For more information, or to nominate someone you know that deserves the recognition, go to the website: ncmvhof.org.