The 11th Annual Airborne Special Operations Museum “Run for the Legend” took place on a sunny Saturday morning at 8 a.m.
The race, which used to be a 10k, was a 5k this year due to construction on their usual route, said Jim Ryder, one of the race’s organizers.
Most of the participants pre-registered, but for those who didn’t, they paid a fee of $20 on site, received their chipped bibs, completed a form, and joined the rest of the people waiting to race up and down Hay Street amongst the traffic behind the museum.

The 11th Annual Airborne Special Operations Museum “Run for the Legend” took place on a sunny Saturday morning at 8 a.m.

The race, which used to be a 10k, was a 5k this year due to construction on their usual route, said Jim Ryder, one of the race’s organizers.

Most of the participants pre-registered, but for those who didn’t, they paid a fee of $20 on site, received their chipped bibs, completed a form, and joined the rest of the people waiting to race up and down Hay Street amongst the traffic behind the museum.

After crossing the finish line, the chip in their bib registered their time. They received a Challenge Coin from the race’s organizers, high fived fellow contestants, and congratulated each other on a good run.

People on the other side of the street handed out bottles of water from the back of a black Honda Ridgeline and cold, wet, blue shirts for runners to drape across their necks.

The first runner to bound under the inflatable, red arch that marked the finish line was 31 year old Duncan Moogi, a native of Kenya and recent addition to the 28th Combat Support Hospital on Fort Bragg.

The hills were rough, Moogi said, a sentiment echoed by his fellow runner, David Resnick, a Combat Documentation and Production Specialist with PSYOP, who said, “The hill going straight up was a little surprise, but that’s all right. It adds a bit of a challenge to it.”

Moogi said, ”I appreciate the effort put by my fellow runners, because they are the ones who pushed me to get this time.”

Not far behind Moogi was the first female to finish, 36 year old Suzy Goodwin. She and her husband, who is active duty with 4th PSYOP group, have run the race every year since 2013, except for the year she gave birth to triplets. Although she was absent the triplets this race, in 2016, she created a Guinness World Record for fastest female to run a half marathon while pushing a triple-stroller.

She and Moogi both received trophies, along with the second and third place male and female to finish.

The fastest three males and three females of each of the eight age groups received a medal. Between the trophies and the medals, there were a total of 54 winners.

Among the other runners was Liz Michalowicz, whose husband is in the 82nd CAB. They’re relatively new to Fayetteville, and racing is one of the things they like to do for fun. While this is their first time competing in this race, she says, “It’s a great way to give back.”

Antonio Renteria, one of the race’s organizers, said the race is their biggest fundraiser of the year.

“It’s a great way for us to get engaged with the community,” he said. “We typically bring in anywhere from 400-500 runners and when you have that many people being able to come down here and see the museum, see what we do, and provide a fun outlet like this to do on a Saturday morning, it means the world for those relations.”