More often than not, we humans gravitate toward duality. Right and wrong. Good versus evil. Light and dark. A moral schism definitely makes for the best kind of story.

We know who to root for and who to rally against. Yet, life is never as clear-cut as Stark versus Lannister. Emotions are the most intimate examples of how we like to demonize certain things and glorify others. Happiness is good. Sadness is bad. Love, good. Anger, bad. But really, emotions are a kaleidoscope of warring feelings that can add up to something beautiful in their totality.

More often than not, we humans gravitate toward duality. Right and wrong. Good versus evil. Light and dark. A moral schism definitely makes for the best kind of story.

We know who to root for and who to rally against. Yet, life is never as clear-cut as Stark versus Lannister. Emotions are the most intimate examples of how we like to demonize certain things and glorify others. Happiness is good. Sadness is bad. Love, good. Anger, bad. But really, emotions are a kaleidoscope of warring feelings that can add up to something beautiful in their totality.

One of the services the Fort Bragg Family Advocacy Program offers monthly in an anger management session. The most recent class took place on July 3 and the next is scheduled for Aug. 1 from 9 a.m. to noon.

These sessions aim to help with personal and emotional management for the goal of lowering incidents of domestic violence.

Charles Pennington, a Family Advocacy Program specialist, has been an anger management instructor for eight years. In his experience, everyone from civilian employees to new military personnel to retirees seek out the anger management course.

“A lot of people that come to the class feel like either they’re wrong for getting angry or their anger is something they need to avoid and we clear that up quite a few times in a quite a few ways during the class,” said Pennington.

The best way to address the stigma of anger is to first clearly define anger management to the audience, said Pennington. They then focus on separating the emotion from the behavior or controlling the behavior rather than avoiding the emotion. Self-care practices are also covered as well.

According to a study published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology in August 2017, researchers found people are more likely to be happier when they feel the emotion they desire, even anger or hatred. Anger, when channeled properly, can be a meaningful and valuable tool to change your life or even the world.

“A lot of people that come feel like you only need to come if you have a problem,” said Pennington. “The understanding that people walk away with is that anger is something natural. It’s something that you can use to your advantage. I feel that’s an essential life skill training that everyone can benefit from.”

The classes are held on the third floor of the Soldier Support Center, Bldg. 4-2843, on Normandy Drive. It is free and open to DoD ID cardholders and their Families. Registration is required to attend. Contact (910) 396-5521 for more information.